Are Banks Finally Ready To Start Lending?

In normal times, today’s combination of record low interest rates and massive infusions of capital into the banking system would ignite the mother of all expansions. That it hasn’t has confused the economists whose textbooks clearly state that it should. And it has convinced the Fed to just keep upping the ante with QE after QE.

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Price inflation approaching

There is some evidence in the UK of a pick-up in consumer spending. There are two likely factors behind this, the first perhaps being seasonal, aided by the fine weather. The second is less obvious, but combines with the first to encourage purchases of big ticket items; and this is cheap consumer finance coupled with growing expectations of higher interest rates in the future.

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The Big Picture: From banking crisis to sovereign debt crisis to currency crisis (diagram)

Last week’s article ‘The Big Picture: From banking crisis to sovereign debt crisis to currency crisis’, provides a brief outline of each of the macro forces and trends that are currently impacting the global economy and financial markets. Today’s article attempts to show these forces in visual form so that investors can begin to understand the interplay between them.

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The Big Picture: From banking crisis to sovereign debt crisis to currency crisis

This article attempts to outline all the macro forces and trends that are currently impacting the global economy and financial markets. It is only by understanding all of these forces (and the interplay between them) that investors can begin to see the inevitable path from banking crisis to sovereign debt crisis to currency crisis.

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Examining the global crack-up boom: Part II

Since the 2008 financial crisis central banks around the world have created in excess of $12 trillion. Not only has their policy of ultra-lose money created another unsustainable boom in asset prices, it is looking increasingly likely that it will end in what Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises called a “crack-up boom”, i.e. a complete breakdown of the monetary system.

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Examining the global crack-up boom: Part I

Since the 2008 financial crisis central banks around the world have created in excess of $12 trillion. Not only has their policy of ultra-lose money created another unsustainable boom in asset prices, it is looking increasingly likely that it will end in what Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises called a “crack-up boom”, i.e. a complete breakdown of the monetary system.

Read more...