The nonsense behind state intervention

Both Keynesians and monetarists believe that increased government spending is sometimes necessary. The intervention is in the form of unfunded government spending, artificially low interest rates, or a drive to make the currency “competitive”. These methods have been tried unsuccessfully time and again, and they must be denounced if we are to understand our true economic condition.

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Recommended Reading: Stimulus and risk – why the Keynesian borrowers are wrong

Economic policy in Britain is in desperate need of a radical overhaul, however Labour’s Keynesian alternative of print, borrow and spend is not the answer. In this excellent article Dr Tim Morgan, Global Head of Research at Tullett Prebon, helps explain why the Keynesian prescription is actually an extremely dangerous and foolhardy option.

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Money In The Bank? No Thanks

Niall Ferguson believes that individual property rights are responsible for turning a bunch of ignorant, “malodorous” Europeans into the world’s dominant culture. That is why the proposed violation of such rights in Cyprus is sending shock waves through the global financial system.

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Osborne’s Budget: Britain’s slow motion bust continues

Yesterday’s Budget once again exposed the tragic reality of Britain’s slow motion bust. The growth forecast for 2013 was slashed, the target for reducing our public debt was pushed back, and the government announced yet more ways in which it planned to re-inflate the housing bubble.

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Gritty Questions on the Historic Collapse: Part II

The current monetary system has a debt foundation, which is collapsing in lockstep with the breakdown in the sovereign bond market. The last 4 years have seen a long drawn-out unstoppable process, where the collapse cannot be avoided. This article addresses a list of critical gritty questions concerning the collapse.

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Recommended Reading: Don’t they get it?

In this article, Dr Tim Morgan explores the disconnect between government policy and economic reality. He discusses the assumption in Britain that “growth will [magically] arrive” sooner or later, “despite evidence to the contrary”, and his charts demonstrate the dangerous trajectory of US Federal debt.

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